Team HBV in Boston

World Hepatitis Day 2013 Gallery

World Hepatitis Day at Chinatown Park, July 28 @ 10 am – 12 pm

Check out our Event on Facebook and RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/rsvpboston

Event Information: Harvard, MIT, and Brown Team HBV Students, in partnership with Quest Diagnostics and MAP for Health, aim for a Guinness World Record to benefit viral Hepatitis awareness. The fair will also provide free t-shirts, healthy snacks, and the opportunity to help create a mural that will be donated to South Cove Community Health Center. Download our printable flyer here and check out our official press release.

What: Worldwide Guinness Book of World Records attempt to raise awareness about the prevalence of hepatitis and disease prevention—especially among Boston’s Asian community. T-shirts and healthy snacks will be provided. Check back on this page after the event for information on Hepatitis screening at no cost from supporter Quest Diagnostics.

When: Sunday, July 28, 2013 @ 10am – 12 pm (Eastern Time). Performance for the Guinness World Record starts at 11am.

Where: Chinatown Park on Rose Kennedy Greenway (located by the Chinatown Gate at the corner of Surface Road and Beach Street)


View Larger Map

Who: Team HBV students from Harvard, MIT, and Brown, experts and employee volunteers from MAP for Health and Quest Diagnostics standing alongside hundreds of community members

Why: According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), roughly 350 million people worldwide have chronic hepatitis B and 170 million people have chronic hepatitis C. While this is far higher than the prevalence of HIV or any cancer, awareness is inexplicably low and the majority of those infected are unaware. That is why viral hepatitis is reputed to be a “silent epidemic” by HHS and countless other global health organizations.

Hepatitis B: In Boston, Asians represent less than 10% of the total population; however they account for more than 50% of new chronic hepatitis B cases. However, hepatitis B is preventable, by using a vaccine and by using protection. Screening also plays an important role in stopping the spread of the disease. There also are treatments that can help.

Hepatitis C: Although baby boomers make up 27% of the U.S. population, they account for 75% of hepatitis C cases. The CDC now recommends that everyone born between 1945 and 1965 take a one-time blood test to check for HCV antibodies. More than half the people infected with HCV develop chronic liver disease, 5% to 20% develop cirrhosis, and 1% to 5% will die of cirrhosis or liver cancer.  To learn more about Hepatitis C, visit Quest Diagnostics.

The team will rally participants to convene and simultaneously perform “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil” actions to highlight the fact that around the world hepatitis needs greater attention. The event is part of the World Hepatitis Alliance’s Guinness Book of World Record attempt to have the most people participate in 24 hours at multiple venues around the world. For more info, e-mail MAP for Health at hbi@maphealth.org.

LINKS

World Hepatitis Day
Hepatitis C Patient Brochure (Courtesy of Quest Diagnostics)
Informative Video on Hepatitis C
Download Printable Flyer

ABOUT

Team HBV has three collegiate chapters involved in World Hepatitis Day in Boston, at Harvard College, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Brown University:
Team HBV at Harvard 
Team HBV at MIT
Team HBV at Brown

MAP for Health is a community-based, nonprofit organization that works to improve healthcare access, disease prevention and service delivery for the API community in Massachusetts.

Quest Diagnostics is the world’s leading provider of diagnostic testing services, with a staff of approximately 900 MDs and PhDs, an extensive network of convenient patient locations and a broad range of diagnostic products.

One Comment

  1. Pingback: Harvard and MIT Students Rally Boston to Join Global Guinness World Record Attempt on World Hepatitis Day | StockRants

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